Wednesday, January 28, 2015

Telling

Fred says: "In our new Republican Senate, the former Subcommittee on the Constitution, Civil Rights and Human Rights will now simply be called the Subcommittee on the Constitution — no more “civil rights and human rights” in the name. Similarly, what had been the subcommittee for Immigration, Refugees and Border Security has abandoned any reference to refugees and is now just the subcommittee on Immigration and the National Interest."

Because Rights and Refugees are so not Republican causes.

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Shepherd, another view

Yesterday I noted that the sheep-wolves-sheepdog metaphor implied a shepherd and then pointed out that Chris Kyle was a vocal Christian, defiantly saying he was ready to answer to God for every shot he'd taken.

But you know, it's possible to see Kyle's shepherd as the government.

One of the biggest sins of American Sniper is that Eastwood uses his not inconsiderable skills as a film-maker to lie to his audience about the cause of the Iraq Wars. He leaps from 9/11 to Kyle in battle, leaving aside any discussion of why we in Iraq and thereby creating the implicature that Iraq was culpable in 9/11. That's a lie. And Eastwood knew it. Any talk about how this film was avoiding politics to focus on a character misses the point: there probably is no way to avoid politics in a film about this war, and if there is, that isn't it. The audience is given Kyle's (probable, certainly in-film) belief as though it were true, told to us not by Kyle but by the omniscient narrator.

A film exploring how Kyle was betrayed by his shepherd the government could have made him into a far more sympathetic character, adding nuance to the third act, when society is tacitly blamed for his inability to reintegrate. And the realization that the shepherd this sheepdog followed so faithfully actually was just chewing him up and spitting him out ... well, that work have been a film worth making.

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Tuesday, January 27, 2015

Sheep and Sheepdogs

One thing about that "sheep - wolves - sheepdogs" metaphor.

Sheepdogs aren't natural. Sheepdogs imply - no, mean - the existence of a shepherd.

Kyle never hid that - he was a very vocal Christian who insisted that "I'm willing to meet my Creator and answer for every shot that I took." And because of that, he really didn't seem to mind how many people he killed or to look at the war with any empathy. God was on his side.

Or he was on God's. Like the Dominicans of the Spanish Inquisition, he was God's Dog. God's Good Dog.

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Oh Bing Bing Bing

OMG. Seriously, Bing. This is just embarrassing. Even though I'm sure you don't have as much experience with Ukrainian, this is just ... Well, look at it.

I was hunting lyrics to a music video I'm going to use in class, because that's faster than me transcribing them, plus the videos don't always credit the songwriters. This is the song, dedicated to the Heavenly Hundred Maidan martyrs, "Мамо, не плач. Я повернусь весною." (Mamo, ne plach. Ya povernus' vesnoyu. - Mother, don't cry. I'll return in the spring.)
Присвячується Небесній сотні... Вічна слава Героям!
Автор тексту:Оксана Максимишин-Корабель.
Автор музики і виконавець:Михайло Олійник.

Мамо, не плач. Я повернусь весною.
У шибку пташинкою вдарюсь твою.
Прийду на світанні в садок із росою,
А, може, дощем на поріг упаду.

Голубко, не плач.
Так судилося, ненько,
Вже слово, матусю, не буде моїм.
Прийду і попрошуся в сон твій тихенько
Розкажу, як мається в домі новім.

Мені колискову ангел співає
I рана смертельна уже не болить.
Ти знаєш, матусю, й тут сумно буває
Душа за тобою, рідненька, щемить.

Мамочко, вибач за чорну хустину
За те, що віднині будеш сама.
Тебе я люблю. I люблю Україну
Вона, як і ти, була в мене одна.


Bing offers this:
Dedicated to the celestial hundreds ... more Eternal glory to the heroes!
Author of the text: Oksana Maksimišin-ship.
Author of the music and the artist: Michael Olijnyk

MOM, don’t cry. I will turn to spring.
In šibku ptašinkoȗ vdarȗs’ your.
Come on svitanni in kindergarten of dew, and maybe rain threshold somewhere.
Golubko, not crying.
So fated, nenko, Word, MOM will not be mine.
Come and poprošusȃ in thy sleep quietly Tell, as implied in the House, dominating.
Me a Lullaby Angel sings I wound lethal no longer hurts.
You know, MOM, and here is the sad case Soul for thee, rìdnen’ka, aches.
Mamočko, sorry for the Black author for what now will be the same.
You I love. I love Ukraine. She, like you, was I one.
#Ȇvromajdan #Euromaidan # Square #Ȇvrorevolȗciȃ
I don't even know where to begin with this one.

For fairness, here's Google's version, much better though far from perfect:
Dedicated Heavenly hundreds ... Eternal glory to the heroes!
Lyricist: Oksana Maksymyshyn-ship.
Composer and performer: Michael Olejnik.

Mom, do not cry. I will return in the spring.
In a pane of glass ptashynkoyu your vdaryus.
I will come at dawn in the garden with dew,
Or maybe the rain fall on the doorstep.
Dove, do not cry.
Yes destined, Nenko,
Even the word Mom, not mine.
I will come and will ask in your sleep quietly
I'll tell you, as understood in a New House.
I sing a lullaby angel
I already deadly wound does not hurt.
You know, Mom, and this is sad
The soul after thee, ridnenka, schemyt.
Mom, I'm sorry for the black kerchief
Because from now on you shall itself.
I love you. I love Ukraine
She, like you, I was one
One thing I note is that neither of them know what to do with the Ukrainian word I, which means "and" or "even" or "too". They both made it "I", in "I already deadly wound/I wound lethal" instead of "and lethal wound..." And neither of them knows пташинкою or вдарюсь, the instrumental of "little bird" and the first person of the intransitive verb "to knock against, to strike", or ненько or рідненька, the vocative of "mommy" and the feminine of "one's own little (something)". There are a few other words that Bing doesn't know (window, dove, mommy, ask); with the nouns "mommy" and "dove" it may be confused by the vocative case ending, and the verb "to ask" doesn't usually have the intransitive -ся (sya) suffix, but "window"?

Also they both translated the second half of Оксана Максимишин-Корабель's name as "Ship". Indeed, the word means that, but you don't translate people's names (unless you're Mark Twain taking potshots at German). She's Oksana Maksymyshyn-Korabel'.

Google's "I sing a lullaby angel" sounds better than Bing's "Me a lullaby Angel sings", but Bing is closer to right, recognizing the accusative case for "me". Plus, what's a "lullaby angel"?

There's too much more to go into. Here's my translation:
Mother, don’t cry. I’ll return in the spring.
Dedicated to the Heavenly Hundred…. Eternal praise to the Heroes!
Lyrics by Oksana Maksymyshyn-Korabel’
Music by, and performed by Mykhaylo Oliynyk


Mother, don’t cry. I will return in the spring.
With a bird’s wings I’ll beat against your window.
I’ll come to the garden at dawn with the dew,
And maybe I’ll fall with the rain onto your threshold.

Sweetheart, don’t cry.
This was foretold, mom,
But the word, mom, won’t be mine.
I’ll come and ask you in your quiet dreams
To tell me how things are in your new home.

An angel will sing me a lullaby
And my fatal wound no longer hurts.
You know, mother, that my soul is sad
Thinking of you it aches, beloved.

Mommy, I’m sorry for the black shawl
And that from now on you’ll be alone.
I love you. And I love Ukraine.
She, just like you, was the only one I had.

screenshot of translation by Bing on Facebook

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1 Comments:

At 12:00 AM, January 28, 2015 Anonymous Kathie had this to say...

My deepest sympathies.

 

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Monday, January 26, 2015

Breakfast al fresco (in NYC)

So, as I said a while ago and Josh at the Comics Curmudgeon points out today, there's often a disconnect between the words and the art in Apartment 3G. And today it's pretty egregious:


Seriously. Margo's on the street.

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1 Comments:

At 8:11 PM, January 26, 2015 Anonymous Kathie had this to say...

Imagine there won't be much al fresco dining in NYC the next couple of days ;-)

 

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Sunday, January 25, 2015

The Week in Entertainment

Live: Annie at the Hippodrome. Goof, energetic performance, great sets, the kids were terrific dancers. Sandy wasn't really into it - when Annie was hugging him as he lay in front of her and singing "The Sun'll Come Out Tomorrow", he lay there, but he kind of twisted his head away and then put his feet on her arms and shoved. It was funny. She was a real pro; didn't miss a beat!

DVD: A few episodes of Search, which I vaguely remember from when it was on in 1972. The tech is ridiculous now, of course, and all three of the leading men (a different one each week) are what I now think of as obnoxiously ladies' men, but it's fun.

TV: I came home to a stack of The Mentalist episodes on the DVR, and I've caught up. This season is really a lot better than I thought it was going to be. The lack of a Red John/secret society of baddies bit is refreshing, and Jane and Lisbon as a thing works very well. The latest one, where Jane tries to keep her out of harm's way, was refreshing. Grimm - whew, they rescued Monroe (which I thought they probably would) and saved Bud (which I wasn't sure of), and Rosalie and Juliet and Renard all were pretty bad-ass.

Read: Ancillary Sword - equally as brilliant as its predecessor. I'm now waiting eagerly for the final volume. Began Mort(e), an odd - very odd - book that's fascinating so far.

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Friday, January 23, 2015

Alabama!

still not tired!!!!
alabama map with equality bars

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Monday, January 19, 2015

Martin Luther King, Jr

Martin Luther KingJanuary 15, 1929-April 4, 1968
Something new to read for today, from Bill Moyers:
Vietnam and the ghetto riots radicalized King. “For years I labored with the idea of reforming the existing institutions of the South, a little change here, a little change there,” King told the journalist David Halberstam in April 1967. “Now I feel quite differently. I think you’ve got to have a reconstruction of the entire society, a revolution of values.”

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Sunday, January 18, 2015

The Week in Entertainment

Live: The Merry Widow at the Met, in a slightly prosaic English translation, but with wonderful sets and the glorious voices of Renee Fleming and Kelli O'Hara, and Nathan Gunn and Thomas Allen and especially Carson Elrod were funny. The fan and pavilion scene made sense - hilarious sense - and Chez Maxim was great.

Film: Birdman, which was not at all what I had expected from the little I had heard but which I thought was marvelous. Keaton was brilliant.

TV: The Middle, mildly amusing, and Modern Family, very funny in the Fizzbo/Lizzbo plot. Agent Carter stays excellent. Galavant is extremely uneven. Grimm was very good but again, omg what a way to end it. Man.

Read: Redemption in Indigo, which was a very good, deceptively spare story that lured me into reading another by the same author; that one, Meeks, was downright peculiar. The Westminster Mystery, another 1930s story which at least acknowledges that the detectives' actions might be on the outside of legal, though justifying them because they catch the murderer.

2 Comments:

At 12:46 PM, January 19, 2015 Anonymous Kathie had this to say...

Can't recall, did you see the Met's new production of "Marriage of Figaro" this fall? We watched it this past PBS Friday night and thought the singing and acting were superb, although other than the costumes/makeup/hair and scenery there was little to suggest it was taking place in the 1930s rather than the 1780s.

 
At 1:27 PM, January 19, 2015 Blogger The Ridger, FCD had this to say...

I did, and I agree. The set was spectacular in person, too. Except for the flashbulb on the camera, there was no sense of the time period, which was good.

 

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